underthenerdhood:

a little girl who grows up thinking all doors are automatic but actually she’s haunted by a really polite ghost

fingertripp:

askatranswoman:

Laura Jane Grace, in all her glory. She’s a trans woman, and she’s also the front-woman from Against Me! (yes, the exclamation point is in the name of the band) and they put out this fantastic album, Transgender Dysphoria Blues, that I will talk about until the end of time. Her writing style is very bracing, and her work comes with a trigger warning, but for anyone that can stomach it, her emotionally powerful lyrics and driving hooks really keep you involved.

PUNK ROCK AS FUCK

fingertripp:

askatranswoman:

Laura Jane Grace, in all her glory. She’s a trans woman, and she’s also the front-woman from Against Me! (yes, the exclamation point is in the name of the band) and they put out this fantastic album, Transgender Dysphoria Blues, that I will talk about until the end of time. Her writing style is very bracing, and her work comes with a trigger warning, but for anyone that can stomach it, her emotionally powerful lyrics and driving hooks really keep you involved.

PUNK ROCK AS FUCK

aqua-twin:

"Maybe you’re not [heterosexual/homosexual/some kind of allosexual], maybe you’re just [insert love interests name]-sexual"

NO, NO THERE IS AN ACTUAL LEGITIMATE NAME FOR THAT

THERE IS A NAME FOR ONLY BE SEXUALLY ATTRACTED TO THOSE YOU HAVE A DEEP EMOTIONAL BOND WITH 

image

And how hard is it to land even a minimum-wage job? This year, the Ivy League college admissions acceptance rate was 8.9%. Last year, when Walmart opened its first store in Washington, D.C., there were more than 23,000 applications for 600 jobs, which resulted in an acceptance rate of 2.6%, making the big box store about twice as selective as Harvard and five times as choosy as Cornell. Telling unemployed people to get off their couches (or out of the cars they live in or the shelters where they sleep) and get a job makes as much sense as telling them to go study at Harvard.

"Why Don’t the Unemployed Get Off Their Couches?" and Eight Other Critical Questions for Americans (via seriouslyamerica)

laughing sobbing and dying simultaneously

(via junkyardvarren)

My mother once told me that trauma is like Lord of the Rings. You go through this crazy, life-altering thing that almost kills you (like say having to drop the one ring into Mount Doom), and that thing by definition cannot possibly be understood by someone who hasn’t gone through it. They can sympathize sure, but they’ll never really know, and more than likely they’ll expect you to move on from the thing fairly quickly. And they can’t be blamed, people are just like that, but that’s not how it works.

Some lucky people are like Sam. They can go straight home, get married, have a whole bunch of curly headed Hobbit babies and pick up their gardening right where they left off, content to forget the whole thing and live out their days in peace. Lots of people however, are like Frodo, and they don’t come home the same person they were when they left, and everything is more horrible and more hard then it ever was before. The old wounds sting and the ghost of the weight of the one ring still weighs heavy on their minds, and they don’t fit in at home anymore, so they get on boats go sailing away to the Undying West to look for the sort of peace that can only come from within. Frodos can’t cope, and most of us are Frodos when we start out.

But if we move past the urge to hide or lash out, my mother always told me, we can become Pippin and Merry. They never ignored what had happened to them, but they were malleable and receptive to change. They became civic leaders and great storytellers; they we able to turn all that fear and anger and grief into narratives that others could delight in and learn from, and they used the skills they had learned in battle to protect their homeland. They were fortified by what had happened to them, they wore it like armor and used it to their advantage.

It is our trauma that turns us into guardians, my mother told me, it is suffering that strengthens our skin and softens our hearts, and if we learn to live with the ghosts of what had been done to us, we just may be able to save others from the same fate.

S.T.Gibson (via sarahtaylorgibson)